Common Childhood Illnesses

Young children often pick up bugs as their immune system is new.  Usually they will get better by themselves in a few days.  You might want to keep some baby paracetamol or ibuprofen in the home - always follow the instructions on the pack carefully. 

You might also want to have a thermometre if you don't already have one.  Old fashioned mercury thermometres are not considered to be safe anymore but digital thermometers are easy to use on a wriggly child.  A temperature is anything over 37.5°C.  Always contact your GP if your child's temperature is over 39°C. 

Below is a series of information leaflets on the most common childhood illnesses.  These provide advice on what you can do to help and when you should see a doctor. 

My child is not feeding, eating or drinking well View/Download
My child has a high temperature View/Download
My child has a rash View/Download
My child has chicken pox View/Download
My child has earache View/Download
My child has a sore throat View/Download
My child has breathing issues View/Download
My child has a cough View/Download
My child has a headache View/Download
My child has a tummy ache View/Download
My child has diarrhoea and vomiting View/Download
My child is constipated View/Download
My child has a nosebleed View/Download
My child has a backache View/Download
My child has cut themselves View/Download
My child has had a fall View/Download
My child has burnt them self View/Download
My child has red eye View/Download

 
 

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